do south park fans read?

A General discussion about everything other than South Park

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aristottlesdeathwish
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Postby aristottlesdeathwish » Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:53 am

music__elitist wrote:i really should warn you pynchon is pure literature. not da vinci's code. as i said, you're showing your ignorance on the subect, which would be fine, except you're assuming things. pynchon my very well be the most challenging author you've ever read unless you've read joyce? if anything, the way you're going into the book (or so you claim?), you won't be prepared for just how much of a bodacious literary virtuoso pynchon is. whatever book you read by him will have 1 of two likely effects: 1. you won't understand the language and put it down. 2. pynchon will immediately become your favorite author, and his brilliance wll awe you.


Language is always good, but I think story telling is more important. Maybe Ill pick up something by him though, I dont know. Probably after Im done reading Liseys story by stephen king and the final book of the dark tower series.
"When you do something right, no one knows you have done anything at all"=Futurama
music__elitist
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Postby music__elitist » Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:57 am

1. yes, story-telling is important, and in pynchons longer novels there tend to be 4 or so intertwining stories being told, all with as much passion.

2. i'm not chicken, against the day, at 1,085 pages, will probably take me to at least mid-december as a full time student and employee. i will read gibbon as soon as i have the chance.
Kyle the Skeptic
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Postby Kyle the Skeptic » Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:08 am

of course I south park fan read. to read help speak english good. but favorite author not me have, so not listing now feel like. :wink:


Actually I've been without something good to read for quite a while now.
aristottlesdeathwish
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Postby aristottlesdeathwish » Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:19 am

music__elitist wrote:1. yes, story-telling is important, and in pynchons longer novels there tend to be 4 or so intertwining stories being told, all with as much passion.
.


Cool, like in "hearts in atlantis". Just wondering, does his dialogue reflect the vernacular of the culture that he writes about? Because thats one thing I cant stand is when they flower it up just so it looks pretty and the characters dont talk like real people. But then again many of his books take place in the past dont they? So I guess it would make sense that it wouldnt be as degenerate as it is now. Do they take place in the past?
"When you do something right, no one knows you have done anything at all"=Futurama
music__elitist
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Postby music__elitist » Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:59 am

V. - all over the first half of the 20th century; linear plot in 50's.
the crying of lot 49 - 60's
gravity's rainbow - WWII
vineland - 1984
mason & dixon - 18th century
against the day - 1893 - 1919?
cedric-digsby
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Postby cedric-digsby » Mon Nov 20, 2006 11:47 am

Finally, the BBS gets a semi-literary thread. Mark Twain begat HL Mencken begat William Burroughs begat Joseph Heller (nephew of Helen Keller) begat Ken Kesey begat Thomas Pynchon begat Kurt Vonnegut and so the rot set in. Twain was honest. All the others are great for inducing snide feelings of superior adolescent angst/alienation, except for the tripe that is Pynchon and Vonnegut. I'll stick with Dr Seuss and South Park.
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albino.black.sheep
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Postby albino.black.sheep » Mon Nov 20, 2006 12:40 pm

music__elitist wrote:i'm not chicken, against the day, at 1,085 pages, will probably take me to at least mid-december as a full time student and employee. i will read gibbon as soon as i have the chance.


Now, who's showing off about how self-important they are? Hmm?

Y'know, it's not the end of the world if you're not the first to finish Against the Day. If anything, it sounds like you ought spend your time catching up on past novels before you started on anything new.

And by the way, pwnt on several occasions.
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Rebecca_Cutswald
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Postby Rebecca_Cutswald » Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:36 pm

cedric-digsby wrote:Twain was honest. All the others are great for inducing snide feelings of superior adolescent angst/alienation


:lol: True! Have you read Captain Stormfield's visit to Heaven or Mysterious Stranger? Oh man- Twain must have inspired so much of everything that is South Park.

The only particularly worthwhile Vonnegut book is Slaughter House Five. Everything else he wrote was in a drunken stupor and is pretty much a pity fest at least from what I've read.

Garcia Marquez is another writer South Park fans would probably enjoy. At least I think so... Of Love and Other Demons even has a pedophile priest in it- who is "in love" with a drugged out aristocrats rabid (or not) underage daughter- who is best friends with a homocidal nun. :cartmanevillaugh: I read that book in a day. I couldn't stop laughing. It is hard to find/write funny novels, Marquez actually pulled it off.

Hrm... I think Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven was funnier though. Oh! Or Twain's journals where the native girls didn't want to offend the missionaries so they would lift their grass skirts to hide their breasts whenever they saw the missionaries. XDDDD Oh man... that was classic and TRUE. Needless to say- lifting their skirts offended the missionaries as well... ^.^
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albino.black.sheep
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Postby albino.black.sheep » Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:40 pm

Aw man, Twain was genius! He's got to be the original king of one-liners.

Huck Finn was probably my favourite book when I was a kid.

And that Garcia book sounds awesome, I'll have to see if I can get a copy.
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crisscross900
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Postby crisscross900 » Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:08 pm

i liked that one book ferinheight 457. god i hope i spelled that right.
cedric-digsby
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Postby cedric-digsby » Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:19 pm

crisscross900 wrote:i liked that one book ferinheight 457. god i hope i spelled that right.


You mean Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451? It had one quotable line that South Park's ethos has disproved:
If you hide your ignorance, no one will hit you and you'll never learn.
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Tweeks_Coffee
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Postby Tweeks_Coffee » Mon Nov 20, 2006 8:27 pm

In response to your response to my radio inquiry (This proxy server won\'t let me quote)

A: I don\'t listen to Ohio broadcast, outside of CD101 if I\'m really bored. I had you pegged for a possible KEXP listener, I was just curious.

B: Yo La Tengo is excellent. Thom Yorke is decent, though I prefered him in Radiohead, myself.
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Rebecca_Cutswald
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Postby Rebecca_Cutswald » Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:36 am

[quote="albino.black.sheep":438e3]

And that Garcia book sounds awesome, I'll have to see if I can get a copy.[/quote:438e3]

Deffinately. It's fantastic. I'm surprised Mr. Elitist accuses SP of being Scatological and therefore "stupid" when he lists Marquez as one of his favorite writers. Of Love and Other Demons has a scat and vomit scene that makes South Park look tame.

I won't spoil anything for you- but if SP hasn't given you a severe phobia of Religious figure-heads- er Of Love and Other Demons will do the job and more than you ever wanted.

To give you some background- Marquez was born and raised in Bogota, Columbia (a not nice place considering it's been in a civil war the past 50yrs) he now lives in Mexico. He witnessed "La Violence" and was raised in a [i:438e3]very[/i:438e3] Catholic community. He's probably had more Catholisism shoved up his ass (er metaphorically?) than any human should and he has personally witnessed more bloody, mindless, violence than any modern American could probably understand. (No offense meant, it's actually a good thing not to be mindlessly violent IMO)

Some how he manages to be a very funny man even while recounting La Violence and the mobs. He's the kind of guy that- once you've read him- you just end up expecting the absolute worst of everything and being incredibly greatful when it [i:438e3]doesn't[/i:438e3] happen.
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albino.black.sheep
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Postby albino.black.sheep » Tue Nov 21, 2006 12:40 pm

LMAO! He seems to have the same mentality as me. Not the growing up in Columbia part, but the things getting increasingly worse thing!

It sounds really good. I'm gonna search the uni library in a mo to see if they have it.
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Olivia42
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Postby Olivia42 » Tue Nov 21, 2006 3:23 pm

I read all the time, but I'm not delusional enough to think what I read is any kind of high literature, nor am I in the habit of lying to look intellectual on some message board. That's an action saved for hitting on English majors.

I'm afraid that because my schoolwork is reading-heavy, I try to read books that are as stupid as I can possibly find. My number one author is Christopher Moore. (It was cool to say you liked him before he became a bestseller, because he was a cult author. Now he's just a popular absurdist fluff author. I love it, though.) My taste in books is about the same as my taste in TV. I like the humor.

I read "literature" from time to time; in fact I'm in the process of reading the entire works of Shakespeare, (I'm almost done with the histories!) and on a whim, I just recently read Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey. But it's nowhere near as much fun as my crazy books, and I never like to keep reading something if I don't enjoy it. About the closest I get to being a real fan of a highly regarded author is my love for Douglas Adams. But Hitchhiker's Guide and Dirk Gently aren't exactly high literature, are they?

I adored Three Men in a Boat, but for some reason, that strikes me as a very low, non-intellectual read. This seems to be true for several classic novels. They're only thought of as intellectually stimulating because they're old, and they lasted so long because the public loved them. Once you get past the language and culture, they're no more difficult than any of today's pop authors.

Now that it's winter break (yes, I just finished my last final an hour ago, and am off until next year) it's the time of year to try out new authors. I'm currently reading Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow. Yes, it's cyberpunk. Sue me.
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