One Christian’s Stance on South Park

Talk about anything South Park

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oxhorn
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One Christian’s Stance on South Park

Postby oxhorn » Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:22 am

Being a Christian, I am often surrounded by friends and family members who abhor South Park. They often expect me to hold the same sentiments they do, and yet I must admit that I like South Park. They think that South Park is a boldfaced attack on Christianity and morality. I don’t, and I do not think that liking South Park is a contradiction of my faith or that enjoying it makes me less of a Christian.

I once got in an argument with some family members about South Park. I was told that South Park was evil and wrong because it is a cartoon aimed at children. But South Park is not aimed at children. It is aimed at adults and has a warning at the beginning of each episode saying that the film should not be viewed by anyone. I was then told that it doesn’t matter whether South Park is aimed at children or not, that because it is an animated program that it therefore falls into the “children’s programming” category, for all cartoons are aimed at children. Again, I had to disagree. After all, some of the earliest cartoons were made for adult audiences. The early Looney Tunes and Merry Melodies cartoons were played in theaters and targeted adults. As Wikipedia says, “…the early thirties cartoons never directly catered to a younger audience… By the late thirties, the series had become edgier, and was more obviously targeted to the adult moviegoers of the time.” It wasn’t until the 1970s that Looney Tunes “…began to be edited to remove scenes featuring innuendos, ethnic stereotypes and extreme violence.” The history of the animated program being targeted towards adults is very clearly established, and one must not restrict a certain type of programming to a certain type of audience.

It is true, however, that many children are naturally drawn to South Park and other animated programs like it because they enjoy cartoons. Many children are raised watching cartoons and gravitate toward animated programs. What, then, should be done? Should South Park be banned, just because some children may watch it even though it isn’t targeted towards them? I say no; if explicit documentaries about violent murders and rapes can be shown on cable television, so should South Park. South Park is already shown in the evenings, around ten o’clock my time, which is an appropriate time slot for an adult cartoon. The truth is that it is up to parents, in my humble opinion, to keep their children from watching shows that were not designed for them. It is their responsibility, not the network or the producers or creators, to regulate what their own children watch.

All of this said, South Park is a vulgar show, which I cannot deny. It is also an interesting and intelligent show (at times). While I do not speak for all Christians, it has become my conviction to not deny myself the good for the sake of avoiding the bad, and I believe that this stance is rooted in scripture. We, as Christians, are to be in the world but not of the world (John 17:14-15). Part of being in the world, I believe, is understanding that we cannot seclude ourselves from the rest of society and make nice little “safe places” for ourselves where we will not be bombarded by the evils of the world. This cuts us off from the people of the world with whom we, as ambassadors on this earth, must associate with. If we never watch the news, never listen to music, never watch movies or television, never read secular books or go to public places, we will become alien wraiths who do not fit into the puzzle of humanity, and this is the last thing we want to be. We are told not to be stumbling blocks (2nd Corinthians 6:3) and yet what do you think we become to non-Christians who see a bunch of stuck up and uptight Christians? If one doesn’t want to watch South Park because he finds it offensive that is fine, but he must realize that there are a lot of offensive things in this world that can harbor a kernel of good, and it would be a shame to miss these things out of fear of being offended.

It is my conviction, therefore, to allow myself to enjoy the good of South Park and ignore the bad of South Park. I find the social commentaries and political allusions down right hilarious. I find some of the jokes and extreme vulgarity (like killing a Kenny look-alike by suffocating him in the “humidor” of the bus driver) unfunny and pointless. But I don’t focus or dwell on that. I find South Park funny for different reasons than others might, and that is fine with me. Now, if a Christian can’t get past the vulgarity and see the ingenuity and wit that are often there, that is fine with me too. And as a brother to them I would never talk about South Park or force them to sit down and watch it if it bothers them, for I should not exercise my freedom to watch it around them if it causes them to stumble (1 Corinthians 8:9). But the same courtesy should be extended to me, and I should not be vilified for finding partial enjoyment in something that happens to be partially vulgar.

What is often brought forth as the gleaming pointed argument against South Park are some of the directly anti-Christian episodes. First, I do not consider the show to be against Christianity. I think it is often against Christians, but so am I at times. One thing modern evangelicals (of whom I consider myself a member, though in a technical sense) is that they can’t seem to separate the Christian from the faith. Just because a man claims to be a Christian doesn’t mean that he is acting like one. Just because a man claims to be representing Christianity properly doesn’t mean that he really is. Just because Christians have their own little cultural quirks doesn’t mean that those cultural quirks should be representative of Christianity. I have no problem with making fun of Christians because some Christians just need to be made fun of. For instance, the Faith +1 episode was downright funny because it pointed out some blatant truths about the Christian music subculture. There is very little Christian music, from my point of view, that is any good at all, and instead of sitting here and getting mad at Matt and Trey for making fun of Christian music, maybe we should just get better. There was also an episode that had a statue of the Virgin Mary shoot blood out of its hindquarters, and when this episode aired there was a huge uproar amongst Catholics (but mind you, there were no riots, no church, mosque, airport or clinic was bombed, and no one was killed via a suicide bomber in response). And it is true; it was a disgusting and vulgar thing to see. But it also raises an interesting point; why is this vulgar and disgusting, but when people think they see blood pouring out of the eyes of a statue it is fine, dandy and even “holy”? In truth it is just ridiculous and gross, and there is absolutely no scriptural foundation for considering blood pouring out of any orifice, let alone that of a statue or painting, to be holy or spiritual in any way. We as Christians have just attached some sort of traditional and spiritual significance to such things when we don’t need to.

And then we come to the direct “mocking” so-called of Jesus himself. South Park has depicted Jesus as a machine-gun wielding Rambo-wannabe, as a vulgar-tongued individual and even as a fool. I can’t see why Christians would be upset by this because the Jesus depicted in South Park is, well, not Jesus. There is a reason why the Old Testament tells us not to depict God with an image, and one of the reasons is that if he has no recognizable form, there is no way he can be mocked with images. But because of the iconophiles we have this idea of what Jesus looks like—a long-haired hippie in a robe—and we attach some sort of significance to this image. In truth, no one knows what he looks like, and the likelihood that a Jewish rabbi from Israel had white skin, blue eyes and long brown hair is not very good.

People have gotten upset with Matt and Trey recently because they said in an interview that it was “open-season on Jesus”. This did not offend me, however, because if you understood the context of the statement you would see that this was actually a criticism of the disparity between how Christianity and Islam are regarded by the secular world. Why is it just fine and dandy to make fun of Christianity and Jesus, but if we make fun of Muslims and Mohammad we are sure to get beheaded or otherwise assassinated? Does it say something about our culture when it is acceptable to make fun of anything Christian, but if we make fun of anything Islamic it is “insensitive”, “intolerant” or not politically correct? This is an injustice and this is not equality. Radical Muslims have a knife to the throat of the entire western world by telling us what we can and cannot do or say, on pain of death. When the Pope said some very innocent remarks the other day in a speech, he was ridiculed by the Muslim world and people were killed. The irony is that the Pope quoted an ancient source who was criticizing Islam’s propensity towards violence. This statement offended Muslims and so they reacted… with violence. It took South Park to show us how blatant this hypocrisy is with their Cartoon Wars episodes, for no one else had the guts (or the will) to highlight this disparity.

Lastly, Matt and Trey are not Christians, so we who are should not expect them to act like ones. How can we get offended and upset at them for making fun of that which they don’t understand? “The story of Jesus makes no sense to me,” said Trey in a recent interview. “God sent his only son. Why could God only have one son and why would he have to die? It’s just bad writing, really. And it’s really terrible in about the second act.” This very clearly demonstrates to me that neither Matt nor Trey understand Christianity, and they can hardly be expected to hold in reverence a faith which makes no sense to them. This was most clearly seen in their episode The Passion of the Jew, which is really one of the only episodes that bothered me, because it made irresponsible conclusions based on ignorance of Christianity.

Father Maxi, the only recurring religious figure aside from Jesus, said that the crucifixion was really a rather small part of the New Testament when in reality it holds an incredibly significant place and was important enough to be repeated in all four gospels. Everything in the gospels leads up to Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. Indeed, the entire Old Testament leads up to these moments, for the prophets all predicted the arrival of the messiah who would die and rise again. To Matt and Trey, the Bible is just a good book filled with fantastic stories that should be taken with a grain of salt and not actually believed. How then can we expect them to understand the significance and reason behind the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ if they don’t believe that the Bible is true? Trey said that he didn’t understand why Jesus had to die; well, I will tell you why. If all men sin (Romans 3:23) and the wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23) then those who sin must pay the price of death. This is why the Israelites sacrificed animals in the Old Testament. They were transferring their sin onto the beasts and killing them to pay that price. The problem with this is that men continued to sin, even after sacrificing the animal, and so they would have to sacrifice another, and another, and what if you died before sacrificing an animal to pay for your sin? What then? This is why Jesus had to die. He came to earth and while he was on that cross he took on the penalty for the sins of all of humankind, past, present and future (1 Co 15:1-3, John 1:29, 1st Peter 3:18, 1st Peter 1:18-19). The only being who could have paid the price for all of man’s sins was God; no man could have done it. And because Jesus rose again, he defeated death, Satan and the grave and bridged the gap between man and God so that all who might seek God would find God. That is why Jesus had to die, that is why God had only one son, and that is why it gets “really terrible” around the second act—because sin and death are terrible things.

The Passion of the Christ was just a movie, but it was a good movie and a fair representation of the crucifixion, though it must be stated that the Bible has far more to it than just the crucifixion. Nowhere in the Bible does it say that we are to condemn the Jews for the death of Christ. Jesus and all of his disciples were Jews. The members of the first churches were filled with Jews. The point is that it was man—all of man, not just the Jews—who are responsible for the crucifixion, for it was for all of man that Jesus died. Kyle was incorrect to feel guilty for the death of Christ, because the Bible does not condemn the Jews and neither does Gibson’s movie. This is really my biggest complaint with any of the episodes, because it misrepresents the movie and the Bible.

But how can I expect two men who do not understand Christianity to depict it properly? Matt and Trey said in the interview that Christianity was “superfunny” and a “ridiculous religion” story. We can’t be surprised at such talk, for this very mentality is predicted in scripture. “…but God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise, God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong…” (1st Corinthians 1:27). Christianity will always sound like silliness to non-Christians, though it might make perfect sense to those who are Christians. That is the way of the world and that is the way it will always be. We need not be surprised.

I like South Park because it picks at those open sores within our culture that the politically correct refuse to acknowledge. Yes, it is often a vulgar show, but I refuse to let this spoil for me that which is funny, witty and intelligent about the show. This is my decision and others need not necessarily take up the same position as me, but I encourage Christians to not “rabble, rabble” against the show when it says something they don’t like, and instead either fix those things within our subculture that are ripe for parody—or ignore it.
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AesopRockOn
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c'mon

Postby AesopRockOn » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:00 pm

dude, nobody is going to read all of that sh*t; compress and condense: then people might take a look. It's what they teach you in school.
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Kyle the Skeptic
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Postby Kyle the Skeptic » Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:43 pm

You were doing fine up until the end, when you started glorifying the execution of Jesus. In this particular instance it seems that Matt and Trey understand the message of Christianity very well. One should focus on what Jesus did and taught while he was alive, instead of focusing on and quarreling over how he got killed. His death is not what made him special; the Romans executed tens of thousands of people in their time. Had Jesus lived his life as a drug addict or a serial killer, his death would have had far different ramifications and nobody would ever have elevated him to iconic status. His actions and the example he provided, not the way he got killed, are what should be important.

Besides to say that Jesus "died for our sins" makes about as much sense as saying that Elvis died for our sins. Why would God have to sacrifice himself to himself to enable him to change a rule he made himself? Did God create a situation he could not solve by any means other than butchering his son / prophet? Or did Satan or the evils of mankind somehow force the hand of an omnipotent deity?

People who interpret the "sacrifice" in that way completely misunderstand the meaning of self-sacrifice, and turn Christianity into more of a death-worshipping religion than that of the Egyptians.
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Postby M00ndragon69 » Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:17 pm

Hey, welcome to the board..Nice essay, but it is a little hard on the eyes, more people might read all of it if you make more spaces between paragraphs.

I agree with you about what you said on the subject of Christian rock..From what I have heard of alot of it, I always kind of felt that if I was a Christian, I still wouldn't like it. The artists who make that genre of music really need to change alot of what they do if they want to produce music that is actually good. Like writting more from personal experience or from what interests them, rather than trying to write what they think their audience wants to hear.


As for your friends and family, if they are that offended by South Park, it might be the best thing for you to do is to not watch it or mention it around them. You sound mature enough that you are probably not still living with your parents, so watching it in front of them is probably not an issue. If they feel that offended by South Park it is probably going to take a miracle to change their opinions, so it is probably just better not to talk about it with them for the sake of avoiding arguements.
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oxhorn
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Postby oxhorn » Wed Sep 27, 2006 9:58 pm

Hehe, just trying to be thorough Aesop.

I agree skeptic, the message of Christianity is totally about what Jesus said and did. However, his death AND resurrection were very important aspects of Christianity. If one is to try to understand how salvation works, he must go to Jesus and his crucifixion and his resurrection. His death is meaningless without his resurrection, and his message is just another wise man's words without his death, for it is through his death and resurrection that we see the glory of God and understand the great gift that God gave us. But I am totally with you on some Christians focusing far too much on his death. Yes, his death and resurrection were important, but so were his words, and they should receive as much if not more attention.

Elvis wasn't God, and so Elvis could not have died for our sins. Here’s how I believe it works: God is a perfect and holy being and cannot coexist with sin, simply because sin cannot survive in the presence of God. Therefore when Adam and eve sinned and caused all of humanity to be born with original sin, mankind became evil and God cut off mankind from himself because he did not want to destroy man. He wanted to come up with a means of saving man and making him holy so that man might be able to be in the company of God. The wages of sin is death; this is that all sin cannot survive in the presence of God and "dies" when confronted by God. In order to save us from this death, God sent his son (who was really himself) to die for us, which was a symbolic and physical act, so that we wouldn’t have to die ourselves. I don't think this is at all equitable with "death worshipping" because those who worship death delight in it. Christians--proper ones--simply understand the reason behind Christ crucifixion, acknowledge his sacrifice and admit that salvation is a free gift from God that we did not earn, and then we go on with our lives acting like Jesus did and trying to be good ambassadors of his name.

Yeah, sorry m00n, I’m an ancient history major and I tend to go off on tangents when I get in the "flow". It looked much better on Word than it did on this forum, heh

There is some Christian rock that I like--but very little. When I listen to Christian music I prefer listening to hymns, for many of them were written simply as an expression of their faith and so that the singer could feel closer to God--it wasn’t about guitars, stages, platinum records and fanboys. When people try and take something like Christianity and try to make it corporate or make a profit from it, it never works out.

Yeah, I don't watch South Park amongst those who would be offended by it. My room mate doesn’t like it, but he tolerates it and when it comes on he will sometimes watch it with me and laugh. Most people I know like South Park. But then again, most people I know aren’t Christians either. Of all my Christian friends, I think I know of only 4 (including myself) who find south park funny, hehe.
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Kyle the Skeptic
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Postby Kyle the Skeptic » Thu Sep 28, 2006 2:25 am

Yet if Adam and Eve broke the rules then they would have to have exceeded God's design, which means that God's creation somehow malfunctioned. According to the Talmud God actually wanted them to eat the fruit, and the Garden of Eden story is a metaphor for how a child develops in the womb and is subsequently brought into the world. But I digress.

So do you have any objection to how God is portrayed as a fuzzy hippo-cat creature who practices Buddhism? :D


Also everyone knows that Jesus was killed in Iraq while trying to rescue Santa Claus from captivity, and he hasn't been back since. Kenny however only takes about a day to come back every time he's killed. Jesus has got nothing on Kenny!
oxhorn
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Postby oxhorn » Thu Sep 28, 2006 6:16 am

Hmmm, what I think is missing here is the ever-fun doctrine of predestination, which is clearly in the Bible--both Old and New Testament--but which many evangelicals these days are uncomfortable with and so ignore. I'd recommend the book "The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination" by Loraine Boettner, but I must warn you that it is thick--not in width but in its content--and might not be a good book for you unless you are super into the nit-picky details of Christianity. But yes, because God is omnipotent, God "predestined" both Adam and Eve to sin--it did not come to pass outside of his will. But he also predestined the ultimate salvation of the "elect" (who did not earn their salvation and have no claim upon it other than that it was given to them out of pure grace and mercy by God). I also believe that the Eden story actually happened, just as the Bible says it did. Of course, there are a lot of Christians who disagree with me and think that the story is not literal, and that is fine. Salvation is not based on whether or not you think Genesis is true. But for me, I cannot fathom believing anything in the Bible without believing everything in it. You can't pick and choose.

As far as God's portrayal as a fuzzy-hippo-cat creature; does it bother me? Well, from an entertainment stance, I think it is rather harmless. Matt and Trey aren't Christians and are just visualizing the God that they think exists, and that’s fine. But no, in reality I do not think that God is an anamorphic Buddhist. Neither do I think he is an old, white-haired man as depicted by much of the west. In truth no one knows what God looks like and the Bible says very clearly that we aren’t to depict him (Exodus 20:4; Leviticus 26:1), at least, we aren’t to depict him or anything else that might become the object of our worship, for God cannot exist in any thing like a statue or a painting, and especially in the early world it was all too easy for men to forget that the image depicted God and was not really God. This culminates, I think, in this visual image we have of Jesus as the long-haired hippy in a robe, an image for which we have no biblical foundation. This has become a problem because people have taken this image to be a representation of God, so when The Passion of the Christ was made, many people who saw Jim Cavezal in his Jesus garb made signs at him or bowed to him or otherwise worshipped him, and this bothered Jim because he was not Jesus--he was just representing Jesus. So no, I don't think God looks like a hippo, or an old man, or a hippy. The closest we can get to imagining God is when the Bible says that we were made in his image. Therefore he must look at least in some way similar to us.

Heh, the irony of Red Sleigh Down was that afterwards Santa comes up and dedicates Christmas to Jesus--when it was Jesus' holiday to begin with. What will be interesting is if they resurrect Jesus in another episode. But I don't think they will do that because I don’t think that Matt and Trey think he is God.
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Gashead
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Postby Gashead » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:34 am

I too am a Christian that loves SP, as is my little brother. I've never had a problem with anyone at my church hating my love of SP.
On a different tangent - while leaving church a couple of weeks ago they played some Christian rock music and I couldn't help replacing the Jesus in the lyrics with baby and it works as a boy band song - strange!
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oxhorn
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Postby oxhorn » Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:43 am

Hehe, yeah, but its harder to do that with hymns ;P
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angeldeb82
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Postby angeldeb82 » Thu Sep 28, 2006 1:26 pm

Gashead wrote:I too am a Christian that loves SP, as is my little brother. I've never had a problem with anyone at my church hating my love of SP.
On a different tangent - while leaving church a couple of weeks ago they played some Christian rock music and I couldn't help replacing the Jesus in the lyrics with baby and it works as a boy band song - strange!


Yeah, but Jack Chick claims that Christian rock music (and all other rock/pop music) "belongs to Satan", when actually it belongs not to Satan but to Jesus. Strange. :?
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Postby Kyle the Skeptic » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:48 pm

I cannot fathom believing anything in the Bible without believing everything in it. You can't pick and choose.

You can't take everything in the bible literally without turning into a complete sociopath. Have you actually read it all the way through? Some of the stories in there are incredibly violent, hateful, and morally depraved by modern standards. It depicts humanity at its worst and sometimes at its best, so naturally not all of it was meant to be followed. Basically you have ancient writings done by different men, at different times, in different places, with different agendas, so it makes absolutely no sense to get literal about it. I see the bible as a whole as a collection of stories, myths, songs, poems, records, and propaganda both religious and political. Very few theologians would disagree with me.

You have to pick and choose, or at the very least consider what the original author's intent was and whether or not it relates to people's lives today. Besides a story need not have happened in order to convey a moral or lesson. The most important part of a story is the message, not the literal details.

It's a lot like any given episode of South Park. When Kyle or Stan sums up the moral at the end with the, "I've learned something today," speech, it tends to reflect the views of Matt and Trey. However just because the moral may be real doesn't mean the events depicted in the story actually happened.
oxhorn
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Postby oxhorn » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:12 pm

I don't at all believe that taking the Bible literally turns someone into a sociopath. Such reasoning would mean that if anyone believed history that it would make him a sociopath; after all, history--both modern and ancient--is filled with blood, violence and death.

I can read the Old Testament as a record of things that have happened in the past. I can read the story about Absalom, David and Tamar and understand that it is a record of historical events; this doesn’t mean that I am going to go rape my sister, make war against my father or kill my son. I can read about God handing over Jericho to the Israelites, but this doesn’t mean that I am going to go find a walled city, circle it a few times while blowing trumpets and expect it to fall down. I can believe that every word in the Bible is literally true, but this doesn’t mean that every word in the Bible is a command to me to act or not act. The Bible is not just the word of God but it is also a narrative; that which was written and designed to be an historical account should be read as such; that which was written as directions to a specific group of people in a specific period of time should be read as such; and that which was written to be wisdom and direction to all men and women throughout time should be read as such. Such a stance does not make me a sociopath, and such a stance is indeed held by most Christian theologians, regardless of denomination, the world over.
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Kyle the Skeptic
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Postby Kyle the Skeptic » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:26 pm

There are also plenty of instances where it does instruct. Take the Ten Commandments for example. A lot of Christians nowadays believe they should form the basis of morals for any given society, and still try to "follow" them. However flip forward a few chapters; same author, same book, same context. The bible calls for violators of the first seven commandments to be put to death. The point is that you have to pick and choose regardless, or better yet eschew the ancient laws altogether and look elsewhere for moral guidance.

As far as historicity goes, it likely wasn't intended to be used as a book of history. After all the ancient Hebrews kept separate historical records, and even refer to these extraneous works several times in scripture. The books that made it into the bible were meant to be stories about the relationships various leaders had with their deity, not records of history themselves.
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Postby MCkormick2 » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:36 pm

Well, I believe, if I was a Christian, I'd be really offended by South Park. I'm just like Mel Gibson, I think you either believe in everything or you don't believe in nothing. I won't try quoting the bible because I know there are lots of passages that are no meant to be understood literally.

But I think that being a Christian, and only choosing to follow some of your church's teachings is wrong. If a guy is like, a murderer, or a rapist, and he still believes that God will send him to his heaven (given he didn't really repent, or he plans on doing this crimes again, like those pedophile priests), he's wrong. He's a hypocrite. I don't see why it should be any different for minor sins. Catholic church used to put homossexuality (or homossexualism, at the time) as high a sin as murder. I wouldn't think any homossexuals should think of themselves as going to heaven in accordance to Catholic's doctrine.

So, I wouldn't say that Matt and Parker would go to Heaven,if the fundamentalist Christians are right.

I also don't think Matt and Trey are always right. If they made an episode talking aboot me being a dick, I wouldn't feel flattered by it. I would be pissed off, or maybe I'd try to change.

I'm sorry if I have offended anyone. It is not my desire to start a flame war on this thread, wich I actually find interesting.
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oxhorn
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Postby oxhorn » Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:21 pm

I think people in this world offend too easily. I think we need to be able to laugh at ourselves and at how we and others act; this is a freedom we should all be able to partake in. Now, I also don’t think it is wrong to feel hurt when something you hold very near and dear gets dragged through the mud. But, as far as religion goes, God can take care of himself. I'm not going to go rampaging down the street asking for South Park to be taken off the air because my sensibilities were hurt. I'm not going to send them a letter laced with whatever because they pissed me off. I think people should choose wisely what it is they decide to get all offended and pissed off over, and for most everything, choose to simply not get offended at all. As far as this show goes, I choose not to get offended because Matt and Trey aren’t Christians and don’t understand Christianity; that is why they feel no remorse for doing some of the things on the show that they do.

Look, no one goes to heaven or hell because he is a sinner. After all, every single Christian on the face of this world is a sinner. It is a Christian’s job to try to be more Christ-like, but he will not fully succeed because he is not God--that doesn’t mean that he shouldn’t still try. If every person who sinned went to hell, well, there would be no one in heaven. That is why salvation is not based on works, but rather on belief. If you believe that Jesus Christ is God and that he died for our sins, was resurrected and now sits on the right hand of the father, you are saved and there is nothing you can say or do that will change this. Of course, the hallmark of a Christian person is that he genuinely attempts to act like a Christian, which means that he doesn’t murder, doesn’t commit adultery and doesn’t molest boys. In the end no man can judge the heart of another man--only God can do that--so we will never really know who is saved and who isn’t. But behavior is a good indication, imhop. There will, however, be repentant murderers and repentant adulterers in heaven; just like there will be repentant liars and thieves in heaven, because "all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God."
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